Recovery Time Objective and Why It’s Key to Business Continuity

If you have never seen or heard the term ‘RTO’ in the context of your business continuity plans or tests, then this will give you a solid next step to ensure that you’re in a good position. Unfortunately, nearly 80% of all SMBs are in the same boat, which has been and continues to be massively exploited by criminal organizations using ransomware to make money. Lots of it.

To paraphrase an old tech adage “if you can’t recover quickly, then it’s not a backup.”

What is RTO?

Recovery Time Objective, or RTO, is the time it will take to restore business operations in any event of downtime caused by hardware failures, ransomware infections, software errors, human errors, and natural disasters

Unfortunately, for many businesses, the problems that arise when RTO is not a key component of the plan isn’t realized until it’s too late. Many organizations have found this out over the last few years because of the ever-growing threat of ransomware attacks.

Many businesses with preventive measures and backups in place end up in a bad situation because their plan didn’t factor in the recovery time for restoring production databases or mission-critical applications.

What is business continuity and what role does RTO play?

Business continuity is the ability for a business to remain in operation despite risks and events of downtime and disasters. By the numbers, 80% of businesses experience some type of unplanned downtime.  Of this total, some experience catastrophic outages that knocks them offline for 3-5 days – and apportion of these never recover and ultimately out of business as a result of the outage.

Simply put, RTO is Business Continuity.  A proper business continuity plan includes:

  1. Identification of potential downtime risks
  2. Evaluating the business impact of those risks
  3. Identifying ways to prevent those risks
  4. Identifying ways to recover from downtime
  5. Regular testing of those methods against specific risks
  6. Regular re-evaluation of risks & methods

Evaluating Your Risks

Evaluating risks can start pretty general and become more specific as you get closer to making buying decisions. Once all systems are listed and evaluated, you can begin posing options for various disaster recovery options and RTO objectives. This will ensure that you have a plan that you need rather than a mix of “too much” or even worse, “too little”.

The benefit of this pre-planning far outweighs any time you saved by skipping it and “hoping” it’ll be enough. Every year, thousands of businesses discover that their “hope” was indeed a poor plan when something takes their business out of operations and they scramble to get back online.

Unfortunately, when it comes to recovery, there are no second chances. Call ECMSI today and get the backup and disaster recovery plan your business deserves! (330) 750-1428

www.ecmsi.com